Earthquakes Are Increasing – It's Not Your Imagination


Image: Three Richter 7 quakes – 7.3, 7.6 and 7.4 – strike the Philippines in 1 hour.


In the U.S., earthquakes pose significant risk to 75 million
Americans in 39 states.
USGS Jan. 2004

July 26, 2010
By Holly Deyo


It's not your imagination. More earthquakes than usual have struck so far in 2010 – at least this early in the year. Because these events have clustered together in the first seven months, it has magnified the data. Whether this increased trend maintains throughout the year is the big question.

Something unique occurred July 23rd, just three days ago. Three massive earthquakes – 7.3, 7.6 and 7.4 – struck the Philippines in rapid succession, like seismic gunfire. Numerous other quakes ranging from magnitude 4.4 to 6.5 then hit the same area.

The good news – which is probably why this hasn't been reported on at length – is that these quakes occurred deeply and just off-shore. Had they erupted near the surface instead of 380 miles deep, we could have seen large tsunamis – especially with three events ripping so closely together. All struck within 67 short minutes.

Friday night Art Bell filled in for George Noory on Coast To Coast AM late night talk radio. Bell now makes his primary residence in a Manila highrise and stated he barely felt them.

For those who watch for antipodal (opposite side of the globe) events, these Philippine quakes would place the antipodal location in South America around central Brazil.

Shaking Big, Shaking Early

This is how worldwide earthquakes stack up to date. Not only has a significant amount of quakes occurred, but extraordinary numbers of people have perished in them.

In less than 7 months, yearly averages are already filling up. The largest shaker category – Richter 8.0-9.9 – has already doubled. Richter 7's are closing in on 100%. Magnitude 6's and 5's are following suit. The number of smaller events is likely attributable to many aftershocks.

It's safe to say this is a very busy year so far and large earthquakes may well break averages in the next few months. We will keep you posted.



GLOBAL EARTHQUAKES JANUARY 1, 1992 - JULY 25, 2010

Mag. 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001
2002
2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Yearly
Ave.
Thru
July 25,
2010
to Ave.
8.0 - 9.9
Great
0 1 2 3 1 0 2 0 4 3
1
1 2 1 1 4 0 1 2 11
200%
7.0 - 7.9
Major
24 15 13 22 21 20 14 23 16 15
12
16 14 11 11 14 12 16 13 151
87%
6.0 - 6.9
Strong
163 141 161 185 160 125 113 123 153 124
130
145 146 154 139 178 168 142 106 1342
79%
5.0 - 5.9
Moderate
1,521 1,449 1,542 1,327 1,223 1,118 979 1,106 1,345 1,243
1,218
1,252 1,637 1,954 1,529 2,072 1,768 1,700 1083 13192
82%
4.0 - 4.9
Light
5,153 5,034 4,544 8,140 8,794 7,938 7,303 7,042 8,084 8,084
8,584
8,454 10,783 13,702 13,048 12,105 12,292 6,980 5,212 13,000
40%
Deaths 3,814 10,036 1,038 7,949 419 2,907 9,430 22,711 231 35,000-
40,000*
1,712
43,819 284,010 82,364 6,605 712 88,208 1,787 225,511 10,000
2255%


*NOTES: At the end of September 2003, the USGS adjusted earthquake global averages for magnitudes 4, 5, 6 and 7. Most have increased, one magnitude decreased in shaker averages. This indicates an overall increase in earthquake activity. To get a fair comparison, both the "old" and "new" averages are included in the chart above.

The exact number of deaths from the January 26, 2001 India earthquake will never be known. According to the Red Cross, "
Death toll reports vary widely, with some ranging from more 20,000 to as many as 100,000."

http://standeyo.com/NEWS/10_Earth_Changes/100726.Earthquakes1992-2010.html