Volcanic Ash Wrecks Indonesian Farmland

About 15 traditional agricultural markets stopped completely. It is quite difficult for us to find any vegetables or agricultural products, fruit or whatever. — Dr. Siti Subandaya, agriculture professor, Jogjakarta Univ.

Globally Grain Reserves Diminish, U.S. Stockpiles in Worse Shape
What They Don't Tell You About Storable Foods


HOLLY NOTE: As more volcanoes reawaken – combined with other disasters – their toll on crops multiply. Though Merapi directly affected crops and livestock thousands of miles away, it's had worldwide repercussions. Indonesia will need to import food, taking yet another hit on shrinking global grain reserves. Rising demand yet lower yields this year are already raising food prices in America and around the world.

Our plumber shared with us yesterday that his wife received quite a shock at Walmart. Last week she purchased $80 worth of groceries. This week she bought basically the same foods, "plus a couple of other small items". Yesterday's grocery bill was $150.

Did you see the Bloomberg headline that higher food prices are likely here to stay? It would be clever to stock up now before prices rise further. Take inventory of your food storage and fill in holes where they exist. For those who haven't even started, get busy, or literally pay the price.

This Thanksgiving, remember how blessed we've been as a Nation. It may be one of the last "normal" such holidays we enjoy...




November 19, 2010
ABC Rural

Rivers of mud and rocks, and clouds of hot ash, have devastated farmland in Central Java, Indonesia.

Photo: A search and rescue team looks for volcano victims in ash-covered Wukirsari village in the Indonesian Central Java province. (Sigit Pamungkas)

The region is short of fruit and vegetables, after a month of eruptions from Mount Merapi volcano.

The Indonesian Department of Agriculture says 2000 cattle and buffalo have been killed and 61,000 livestock are at risk of starvation, because ash thickly covers their grazing land.

Dr Siti Subandaya, agriculture professor at the University in Jogjakarta, says the once fertile farmland could take 10 years to recover.

"About 15 traditional agricultural markets stopped completely. It is quite difficult for us to find any vegetables or agricultural products, fruit or whatever."

http://www.abc.net.au/rural/news/content/201011/s3070917.htm