Prep Your Pet

May 5, 2001



Page One
More Than Animals
Don't Leave Home Without Them!
EARS
Pet Disaster Planning
Disaster Prep For Dogs & Cats
Page Two
Disaster Prep For Dogs & Cats (Cont.)
Disaster Prep For Birds


Page Three
Disaster Prep For Horses
Bubonic Plague Threat
Comet Does The Splits




DAFFY DOGS AND FREAKED FELINES

You may want to purchase a plastic airline container or collapsible wire crate to transport your dog or cat. It makes for more peaceful nerves for all concerned. Be sure the crate is large enough for your dog or cat to lie in comfortably. Food and water bowls can be purchased that snap onto the wire door. Above each water container on the outside of the wire door, we attached a small flexible funnel. Push the funnel tip through the mesh so the tip sits 1/2 inch inside the water bowl. This allows you to refill their water without opening the door - a great idea if the animal is stressed and eager to bolt. Bowls snapped onto the cage also help eliminate spilling and allows more room for stretched out snoozing. When Taco isn't drinking from hers, she uses it as a chin rest. Guess she's not too fussed about dog hair in her water!

We purchased these two Petmates from VariKennel, but there are numerous other manufacturers. Most models break down in seconds for easy storage by unscrewing a few bolts around the middle.

Taco left, indignant at first to be sitting in "doggy jail". Seismo, right, resigned himself early to Fate. Now they're both at ease traveling in these containers.

Since Taco and Seismo are still over at the "doggy Hilton" while we're in the motel, we've used these airline approved travel crates quite a bit. On Saturdays we've been taking them to the mountains on picnics. Taco has a touchy stomach and tends to get car sick without an anti-static strap attached. Since we now have a car (no pickup) we were extra careful the little darlin' didn't throw up on the carpet. Only having the car a few days and no tools, we hadn't attached her anti-static strap yet. Before leaving for the San Isabel Mountains, we lined their travel containers with newspaper, "just in case". Sure enough, it was good planning. Taco must have been green under all that fur. The newspaper-lined VariKennel caught the mess. Poor baby. By the next weekend, we had her "anti-barf" strap installed!


STAKES AND TIE-OUTS

Another idea is to purchase a metal stake for dogs that screws into the ground. To use, snap the chain to the dog's collar and you can rest easy they're secure. Make sure you purchase a heavy enough stake so that they can't pull it out of the ground. Be sure to use a chain and not a leash so it can't be chewed through.

Sadly, we have heard many instances where people left their dogs chained on porches and hung themselves by either slipping through the rails or falling through the stairs. Make sure the metal stake is located away from hazards (including aggressive animals) and has protection from the elements.



Photo by Joshua Rosenblatt
FIRST AID KIT

Check with your veterinarian to find out what he/she recommends you include in your first aid kit. Suggested items include:

QTY
FOR DOGS and CATS
1
4
4
1 roll
1 roll
1 sm. box
1 pkg.
1 tube
1
1
1
1 each pet
4 pair
1
1 each dog
1 tube
3 months supply each pet
1 set each pet
first aid book for cat or dog
conforming bandage (3" x 5" - 7.6 x 12.7 cm)
absorbent gauze pads (4" x 4" - 10 x 10 cm)
absorbent gauze (3" x 1 yard - 7.6 cm x 1 m)
medical tape (1" x 10 yards - 2.5cm x 10 m)
cotton swabs
antiseptic wipes
emollient cream like Panalog
tweezers
scissors
nail clippers
instant cold pack
latex disposable gloves
rectal thermometer
proper fitting muzzle (dogs only)
hair ball medicine (cats only)
any medication you pet uses regularly
medical records, including vaccinations


PICTURES

Keep current pictures of your dog or cat in case your pet gets lost during the disaster. Be sure to include yourself in some of the pictures in case you have to show proof of family membership.


TOYS

Like with people, familiar things are comforting during stressful times. Pets get bored easily especially if he is the only animal and his master is busy coping with the emergency at hand. Toys and treats will take your pet's mind off the upheaval by giving him something to keep him occupied. Even if he doesn't play with it, the familiar scent gives a feeling of continuity.


DISASTER PREP FOR BIRDS

Here are the supplies that you should have in a disaster kit for birds. Adjust the amounts, depending on the number of birds that you have.

FOOD

Keep at least a two week supply at all times. Your feathered family member is likely to be stressed during a disaster so store the brand of food your bird is used to eating. Store food in an air tight, water proof container and rotate supplies at least every six months.


GRAVEL

Keep at least a two week supply at all times for birds that need this product.


CUTTLE BONE AND/OR BEAK CONDITIONER

Always have an extra one on hand.



WATER

Keep at least a two week supply at all times. Store water in plastic containers and keep in a cool, dark place. Rotate stored tap water at least every six months.


CLEANING SUPPLIES AND PAPER TOWELS

Store disinfectant and paper towels to clean your bird's cage. Have at least a two week supply of whatever it is you put on the bottom on the bird's cage (i.e., newspaper, butcher paper, gravel paper, etc.).


EXTRA SEED BOWLS AND WATER CONTAINERS

Have several seed cups and water containers to replace ones that might get broken. You may want to put an extra food and water dish in the cage, so that in case you forget to feed the bird in all the confusion, the bird will have plenty of food and water.


FIRST AID SUPPLIES AND BOOK FOR BIRDS

Check with your veterinarian to find out what he/she recommends you include in your first aid kit. Some suggested items include - Kwik Stop or cornstarch to stop bleeding, tweezers, heavy duty gloves for handling the bird if it is injured and tries to bite and bandaging materials.

If your bird is on long term medication, be sure to have at least a two week supply on hand.


NET AND TOWEL

In case you must recapture your bird, store a long handled net with small enough mesh so your bird can't poke his head through. A heavy towel or blanket large enough to cover the cage will supply the necessary warmth should disaster strike when it's cold.

EVACUATION CAGE

Purchase a small cage for transporting your bird and be sure it is one that your bird can't chew through. Make sure your cage is secure. All doors, removable top or bottom should be fastened to prevent accidental opening during a disaster. Twist ties or metal rings can be used to secure the cage. Fastening the cage to a wall with a hook and eye could be very helpful. Keep in mind any objects that might fall during a disaster and be sure to keep the cage away from windows that might break during a disaster. Keep pliers and wire in your disaster supplies to repair the cage after a disaster.



FLASHLIGHT AND EXTRA BATTERIES

A flashlight will regulate the light hours for your bird, which is important for your birds health.


PICTURES for I.D.

Take some recent pictures of your bird, including any distinguishing marks or coloring. Include yourself in some of the pictures for proof of ownership.

Microchipping is also a clever idea since birds can't wear collars and tags. Your veterinarian can provide more information about this permanent form of I.D.


TOYS

If your bird has special toys he likes to play with, keep a duplicate set with his emergency supplies.


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Text and Graphics, 2001 Stan and Holly Deyo, except where otherwise credited